13 February 2012

knitting.


i bought this kit and have watched about two hours of youtube/other videos, all of which tell me how easy knitting is if you just do it correctly.  well, let me tell you something, that is a load of crap. maybe it's because my yarn is wool and messy and i don't like messy so i go super tight and then can't move stitches (or whatever they're called) from one needle to the next?  or maybe it is because i'm starting out with 15mm wooden needles?  or maybe it's just because i'm an idiot?  it seems so easy, but seriously, you should see the shit i've come up with.  just some rats nest of yarn that is fraying because i'm constantly starting over.

so, i'm bound and determined to make that stupid snood, before it warms up even, and am wondering ... should i pick up smaller needles and yarn to practice with?  i'm talking straight up basics ... knit one purl one ... this has been impossible for me so far.  OR should i just suck it up and take a class?

14 comments:

  1. Knitting is on my list of crafts to master, too, and I haven't tried this yet, but I've heard that the huge needles & thick yarn are the easiest way to learn.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Remember that knitting is not a natural movement and takes some time to build up muscle memory. I got better much faster after I took a class, but I learn best by having someone show me - an experienced knitter can help you with pointers by watching your motion. You may even just want to call a local knitting shop and see if you can set up an appt just to drop by and have someone take a look at what you're doing.

    I do recommend you get some smaller needles to practice with -- more in the 5mm-8mm range, along with some fairly smooth, light colored yarn (easier to see what you're doing). Make a little bookmark or two to practice before you tackle something bigger. Just my 2 cents (as a knitter of 10+ yrs.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i picked up some smaller needles and different yarn to practice. i've also scheduled a knit shop date! i'm so excited.

      Delete
  3. I have tried to teach a couple folks to knit using large needles and yarn, thinking it would be easier to learn, but I recently taught someone using circular needles (smaller and easier to maneuver) and worsted weight yarn ("regular size") and she picked it up much faster that way. Just an idea. I agree with Lindy about getting an experience knitter give you pointers and just see what you've been doing. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  4. i learned on 10mm needles & some soft baby alpaca yarn. i can see how 15mm might be difficult because the sheer size of those things could make you clumsy. it's easier to learn with a real life person, but when one wasn't available youtube videos were my fallback.

    purling on your first project might be over-achieving. it took me knitting 3 small square baby blankets, about 4 hanks each- NO purling whatsoever, just simple knit stitch before i was comfortable trying anything new. i still prefer 10mm needles & average sized yarn. i'm always tempted to go bigger so the project gets done faster...

    my NUMBER ONE advice is to relax. the size of your needles or chunkiness of your yarn have NOTHING to do with tight stitches that are hard to transfer from one needle to another- that is just your tension manifesting itself into your project. i find myself doing it the first few minutes of knitting until i remember to relax & let all tension out of my hands/arms.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i know, relaxing is not what i do best ...

      Delete
  5. A real life person will be so much easier to learn from. Some knitting stores will teach you if you buy the supplies from them. Also, yes to smaller needles. Those big ones are tricky to start.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I say take a class... it would be a fun social activity, too, no? (PS I know nothing about knitting.)

    ReplyDelete
  7. because you care about my personal life. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Knitting too tightly is the ultimate beginner's mistake. It makes it *really* difficult to do it. Good luck :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Learning from someone makes it much easier. One Little Star is right. Head to an LYS (local knitting store) and ask for some help. You'll get it and then you'll be so addicted! I just learned about 6 months ago and I'm loving it!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Once you get the hang of it, you'll love it. And I think it's really hard to learn how to knit by reading or even just watching videos. Having a live helper is definitely easier.

    And I would have suggested getting chunkier yarn and larger needles and just loosely knit everything for your very first project. And as a beginner, I use to want to have everything tight, but that's always a bad way to start.

    Good luck on your knitting adventure! Hope you love it as much as I do.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hello, well, my answer may "disturb" you, but when I look at the kit you bought I thought "crochet" not needles. It is much easier to learn and to achieve! and when you go wrong it's much easier too to undo it! so my advice is: change your needles for a crochet, same size and learn crochet on youtube (easy for sure!!!)and you can do your snood in round, very easy; I wish you good luck and happy snood (wonderful by the way...) :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Super late to the game here and we don't like, know each other, but I'm officially offering knitting help, if you'd like it. I agree with the poster above - I wouldn't bother with purl stitches for your firstfirst piece ever. I think an all knit stitch scarf is the best way to learn and get comfortable with what you're looking at.

    Also, and I swear its not self-promtion, just an offer for help - I have knitting info/links/tutorials on my site. Stop by if you still need assistance.

    ReplyDelete